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New Occult Fiction Book


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#1 SuccubusSherry

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Posted 01 February 2019 - 05:50 PM

I write occult fiction about real magic, not the Harry Potter kind of magic. There’s a new novella ‘Mount Clexa’ coming out today 01 Feb 2019 under my Lena Chere pen -name.

Description: This story is told in the first person by Clexa, a servitor horse. Bound to a magician in service, she finds herself forced to explore the aethyrs of the Enochian magic system with him, and to carry out a revenge curse on a girl when she would prefer to spare her. Follow the adventure as Clexa responds to these challenges.

Where to buy Mount Clexa: https://books2read.com/u/mqVKn8


These posts don’t have to be just adverts- feel free to discuss what you think about giving out occult information through fiction. Dion Fortune and others have done this, though you may think it is wishful thinking for me to compare myself to Dion Fortune!

What do you think about channelling some of my books? The Lena Chere ones are not channelled, but some of my others are, from an entity I met while studying chaos magic. Basically it means sitting there doing telepathy for a little while each day until you have got thousands of words. I write fairly short books around 18,000 words, but that's still a lot to pick up from someone else.

Edited by SuccubusSherry, 01 February 2019 - 05:51 PM.

See my blog for micro-fiction, poems, a few weird articles and links to my books: https://candyrayblog.wordpress.com

#2 R. Eugene Laughlin

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Posted 02 February 2019 - 04:11 PM

View PostSuccubusSherry, on 01 February 2019 - 05:50 PM, said:


feel free to discuss what you think about giving out occult information through fiction.

I like it. Art is at its best, perhaps, when it takes aim at truth per se. Inasmuch as magic is a function of inspiration, good fiction can be instructive with or without being magically-themed.

I know a couple of people who started out with the intent of publishing occult non-fiction, but who transitioned to primarily writing fiction for very practical reasons. For one, publishing deals in the occult non-fiction market are notoriously one-sided in favor of the publishers. There are exceptions but the fairer publishers are also associated with radically reduced circulation. The bottom line is that if one cares more about being read than being paid, the big houses will publish and sell well-written works. And then, good, bad, or indifferent; they'll publish even if it's largely a repackaging/rephrasing of material they've previously published several times over. The bigger houses tend to aim at the entry-level seeker, because its a constantly renewing market, where the market for advance occult studies work is utterly tiny. To complete the picture, some of these houses will obligate authors to some amount of promotional activity, and will arrange promotional tours, but it turns out the author has to finance the travel expenses themselves. It's not uncommon for a writer to spend more money in the release year than they make on a book in their lifetime. Getting a better deal in occult non-fiction generally takes several good-selling works for very little profit to the author, and then a really good agent.

So, fiction is better in a lot of ways. There's a wider range of publishers that offer better deals. A challenge is that with rare exception the big houses don't take author-direct submissions: one needs an agent to break into that scene, and often having an agent they already know is key. If a big house believes in the work, however, they're much better about advances and the marketing and promotional expenses. .

So, a savvy magician with a knack for creative writing can transmit a lot of usable instruction in a fictional context, if that's their intention. However, as one of my friends who's working along those lines put it, real magic is boring compared to Harry Potter magic, so it's tricky, and it won't pay to be snooty about blending in fantasy that isn't part of the day to day magic of lifestylers like ourselves. One of the more successful stories along these lines that I've read, though it isn't published to date, was just a good story about people, some of whom were lifestylers like ourselves. The only place where fantasy came into play in the story was where one of the characters tended to make outlandish claims about what her magic was doing, and by and by her mistaken beliefs left her shocked by the way events unfolded. What I loved about the story was that by the end, what seemed like little unrelated threads here and there were all along conspiring to culminate in a truly fantastic result: basically the nature of things, as it were, turned out to be most awe-inspiring and magical.

View PostSuccubusSherry, on 01 February 2019 - 05:50 PM, said:


What do you think about channelling some of my books?

There's at least two ways to think of that: at the level of the story, if its good its good and the process that produced it is secondary for the reader. For an occult-oriented discussion site, the process is interesting for its own sake. I'm certainly interested in what you might have to say about that process.

Edited by R. Eugene Laughlin, 02 February 2019 - 04:26 PM.

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#3 SuccubusSherry

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Posted 03 February 2019 - 02:39 PM

Thank you for the informed comments about the occult publishing world, Eugene. Previously I've ended up bypassing that whole commercially-oriented milieu and self-publishing free eBooks, and those are going quite well now that they are established, and are being read.

I did think about getting a literary agent. One night over a year ago my local writer's group had a 'meet the agents' night, and I read out the beginning of my latest fiction work to a small group of invited agents. I've always described it since as "they looked at me as if I had three heads." Was I thinking of those illustrations in the Lesser Key of Solomon? I then explained that I was deliberately writing for a minority audience, whereupon they looked at me as if I had four heads. So I self-published as usual, and it has been fairly popular as a free book. I think the language is everyday and easy to follow; have a look if you like:

https://www.smashwor...oks/view/770469

I don't believe in being obscure, not even as much as Aleister Crowley sometimes was, although I like what I've read of his fiction. My new venture is books for sale, but despite earlier resolutions to act more like the professional authors do, I'm still being an independent rebel- so we'll see.

R Eugene Laughlin said: "real magic is boring compared to Harry Potter magic"

See, that's why my stories contain so many sequences that are astral projection or dreams. The astral world is much more exciting than our physical world, and besides I've always really loved the astral plane.
See my blog for micro-fiction, poems, a few weird articles and links to my books: https://candyrayblog.wordpress.com

#4 SuccubusSherry

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Posted 03 February 2019 - 03:22 PM

View PostR. Eugene Laughlin, on 02 February 2019 - 04:11 PM, said:



There's at least two ways to think of that: at the level of the story, if its good its good and the process that produced it is secondary for the reader. For an occult-oriented discussion site, the process is interesting for its own sake. I'm certainly interested in what you might have to say about that process.

The way I started off was by writing one paragraph of Ino's story and then one paragraph of my story each day. She instructed me to do the usual telepathy that I do when I wrote her paragraph, writing down what she put into my mind as her side of the conversation. After that I was to try and remain in the same receptive state while writing my own paragraph, to help ideas to come through from the subconscious mind. That worked very well for short stories and it seemed at first that there was no need to bother about the plot which unfolded by itself. However, I did notice that often I had to go back after the story was finished and revise to improve the structure, whereas Ino didn't have to do that and she could just resume and be straight back on track with the plot of the story. Ino refused to let me edit anything she wrote at first, and there were a few archaic structures like 'upon' instead of 'on' which she wouldn't let me take out.

As time went on it changed. We went on to novellas, longer than short stories, (although in the technical language of writing, only one of Ino's is long enough to be a novella and her other one would be called a novelette.) That 'one paragraph each' practice stopped then, and I would become absorbed in working on mine for a while, no longer in a receptive state but in the usual state authors are in of concentrating, and feeling inspired. Then I would become absorbed in working on hers for a while and it would be just like when I have a long conversation with an angel or demon,or a god, which I do frequently. The writing side of it was relaxing because there was no need to think of something to write! Eventually Ino did let me edit her stories, but she kept interrupting and saying "read it to me" and that kind of thing.

One summer we wrote a large number of very short flash fiction pieces. Often we had a writing prompt and each of us would do an interpretation of it. Most of those are on my blog, and some of Ino's are collected on a free PDF. Some of hers are rather sinister, I think!
See my blog for micro-fiction, poems, a few weird articles and links to my books: https://candyrayblog.wordpress.com





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