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Experience With African Dream Root?


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#1 Gray1849

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Posted 29 October 2015 - 07:22 PM

I have been drinking tea made from African Dream root or Silene Capensis for a couple days now and while I have been able to remember my dreams better. I haven't had most of the experiences that a lot of people have associated with African Dream root. Has anyone else had any experiences with taking African Dream root?

#2 Curious Cat

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Posted 29 October 2015 - 10:06 PM

I tried this in tea and I also made capsules after grinding the root. I found it was completely worthless. If you want to use something to increase lucidity, a small piece of a nicotine patch or galantamine actually works.

#3 Gray1849

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 08:11 PM

I will look into that and that makes sense since I think its the triterpenoid saponins contained in the roots that are supposed to produce lucid dreaming. I'm going to keep taking it at least for another couple weeks since everything I've read says it needs to build up in your system, but my expectations are not high at this point.

#4 R. Eugene Laughlin

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Posted 30 October 2015 - 11:29 PM

I haven't taken the substance in question, but I have some thoughts.

It may be that the tradition expectations for the substance are based more on the magick and ritual around its use than on its physical pharmacology. If so, it's quite possible that the traditional rituals upon which the expectations are based are lost or too obscured to recover. There may yet be viable options for people trained in common modern magick forms. For one example, a consecration ceremony for activating a talisman might be adapted to activate the magick properties of the herb. Another alternative might be to evoke the spirit of the herb using somewhat Goetic methods, and asking (or ordering if that's your way) it to do its job.

One might be thinking at this point that if it's going to take all that kind of effort to make the herb work, why not skip the herb and just make a visual dream sigil, or evoke the spirit of dreams, etc. My default response to that kind of thinking is that working with the herb in this manner might be more effective for some magicians than a visual sigil, etc.
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#5 Gray1849

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 02:41 AM

Thats a really good to point since the traditional user of African Dream root are Xhosa shamans for the purposes of initiation. Also, after further research I've been taking it wrong I've been drinking it in a tea whereas it is supposed to mixed to the point where it creates a thick foam and its the foam that is supposed to be consumed. Side note the Xhosa also wear pieces of the root as talismans against bad dreams.

#6 Curious Cat

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Posted 07 November 2015 - 03:16 PM

I had one dream that I believe was related to using the dream root when I first started using it. I wrote it down, but it was some years ago and I am not sure exactly where that old dream journal is located since it was so many years ago.

What I remember about the dream mostly was that a man dressed all in white appeared and he was wearing a white top hat. He showed up and asked me various questions that I don't remember now. It was more vivid than a normal dream, but at the time I wasn't involved in spiritism the way that I am now, so I did not think that much of it in terms of spirit contact. I just thought that the dream root was beginning to work. I was more interested in the pharmacological aspects of plants and not what Eugene talked about earlier in this thread.

I kept taking the root for a while, but nothing else like that happened, so I assumed that it was not a pharmacologically useful plant.

#7 jes

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Posted 14 November 2015 - 08:04 PM

My brother -who doesn't engage in occult practices, or at least think of them as such- tried it and said he had some interesting lucid dreams. He also said it might have been placebo.
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For my will is as strong as yours, and my kingdom is as great.... you have no power over me.

#8 SilentSeeker

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 04:18 AM

Greetings,

The following is pretty much a cliche but mugwort works wonders, especially the first few times you take it. Tolerance does seem to dim its effects somewhat, but the dreams never the less possess a more 'solid' quality about them. I've recently taken a route that you may be interested in taking and that's making a tincture of the stuff--whether mugwort or dream root. My recent experiences with the former have proved most promising and I would recommend that avenue for any person looking to increase dream clarity/lucidity (tincture usage doesn't preclude REL's suggestions which I believe when used in tandem, will augment the effects of what ever herb you decide to tincture-ize).

Cheers and Be Well

Edited by SilentSeeker, 16 November 2015 - 04:19 AM.

“The fish trap exists because of the fish. Once you've gotten the fish you can forget the trap. The rabbit snare exists because of the rabbit. Once you've gotten the rabbit, you can forget the snare. Words exist because of meaning. Once you've gotten the meaning, you can forget the words. Where can I find a man who has forgotten words so I can talk with him?”
―Zhuangzi


The Tao gives rise to all forms, yet it has no form of its own.

If you attempt to fix a picture to it in your mind, you will lose it.

This is like pinning a butterfly: the husk is captured, but the flying is lost.

Why not be content with simply experiencing it?

--Attributed to Lao-tzu


#9 R. Eugene Laughlin

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 03:52 PM

A few researchers recognize that mainstream medical diagnosis and treatment is a highly ritualized process with generations of precedent. Social stereotypes about doctors and nurses, and some standardized iconography are firmly rooted in the culture. Patients arrive at the doctor's office or hospital with strong expectations, with acutely-trained attention, with high hopes, and with some fears. Altogether such factors reasonably contribute to the internal environment (or state if you will) of the patient, which many clinicians recognize can have an impact on the effectiveness of various treatments

Research taking these facts into account is beginning to suggest that even for drugs with well-known actions and well-established, measurable physiological effects (agents used to treat blood pressure, heart rate, blood viscosity, blood sugar and so on), even those drugs depend somewhat on the ritual of medical treatment. Some findings demonstrate that the drugs don't appear to work as well when the elements of medical ritual are substantially altered.

Here's the money shot:

It's reasonable to consider that taking a novel drug with the expectations of pharmacological effects but absent the ritual attending mainstream medical treatment may reduce the pharmcodyamic potential of the drug once taken. From that it's further reasonable to consider that drugs with low pharmacodynamic impact to begin with might have no impact at all when taken outside of the standard medical context.

***

To complete the picture, we might also consider the rituals accompanying illicit drug seeking and drug taking, the rituals attending older or alternative healing methods, and the rituals attending modern magick operations.The common ground of ritual in general is its target: the internal state (expectations, tuned attention, hopes, fears, etc.) of the treated individual. My feeling is that the effectiveness of X (drug use as an example but I feel this is a more general principle with wide-reaching implications) is somewhat tied to the congruence of the intention of X and the attending ritual.
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