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"necromancy" In The Pacific Northwest

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#1 Wretched

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 11:12 PM

So some time ago, I moved to America's Pacific Northwest, and I've noticed a strange trend. For all the hippies, flufsters, new agers, and reiki-fanatics out here, there's a large number of self proclaimed "Necromancers" fully decked out on their paths. Tattoos of seals and sigils to the extent that some have them on their foreheads. Many of these people live on the fringes of society, but not all, and they've all seemed completely open about their practices to the point of having impromptu rituals outside of the bars, leaving glyphs and seals about the city streets and backalleys.

I believe some of this is just a part of a larger subsect of the street magick that goes on in this region. Urban shaman and street mages roaming around the shadows, ministering to the people of the streets, but I think this current flows from a different source, at least in part. There also seems to be a strong influence from Aesatru that comes and goes within these elements as well, which I also find interesting.

Back to the point though. Has anyone else had dealings with, or heard stories of, things relevent to this phenomena? I'd be interested in hearing.

#2 Tenebrae

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 11:42 PM

Pennsylvania is a very dark place.

The entire state radiates a very dark feel, or so it did within Williamsport... I'm not sure the exact locations you speak of, but that's my place of birth...and I tend to delve into the darker aspect of things.

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#3 Brennan

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 12:54 AM



I don't know exactly where you are in the N.W., but a great deal of it is Crow's turf. I have never before felt such a strong presence from an animal in my lofe, except when I was in Washington. So thick I wore it as a cloak, I shit you not. When I wore that essence, it was like half of me was bone, and the other was flesh and muscle both both were alive, just in opposite directions. Very, very beautiful experience.

#4 Wretched

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 01:35 AM

View PostBrennan, on 24 May 2014 - 12:54 AM, said:

I don't know exactly where you are in the N.W., but a great deal of it is Crow's turf.

Now that's something I can agree with. The signs are so thick that I've seen people feeding the crows, with food they've purchased specifically to feed the crows in fact. Perhaps I should look into this aspect some more, myself. Interesting.... *strokes chinfur*

#5 Tenebrae

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 01:41 AM

Odd, for some strange reason I thought that you said Northeast.

In that case, after having seen photos of Washington and Oregon in the past, I had a very similar feeling to what I get when I'm in Pennsylvania. I have a feeling that it has something to do with the forests, the landscapes of these areas just have such a dark feel about them...similar to the Aokigahara in Japan.

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#6 z0b

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 01:03 PM

Never been to the northwest but tenebrae is right about Pennsylvania being a dark place it is also my home state the crow has a strong presence here as well along with many other old dark things.

#7 Tenebrae

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 05:11 PM

View Postz0b, on 24 May 2014 - 01:03 PM, said:

Never been to the northwest but tenebrae is right about Pennsylvania being a dark place it is also my home state the crow has a strong presence here as well along with many other old dark things.

It's the forests, don't you agree?

There's just something about that type of forest...and you see similar in Oregon and Washington. I can't say for sure if it feels the same over that way...but it surely has the same feel when you look through photos, same feeling you get when you're wandering the wilderness of Pennsylvania. It's almost like the state is alive, the landscape itself.

Edited by Tenebrae, 24 May 2014 - 05:13 PM.

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#8 RoseRed

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 07:41 PM

Have you wandered through the Scranton area?
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#9 z0b

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 08:33 PM

Yes the forest are very alive for the most part.I have been in the Scranton area some along time ago.The darkest place near me is Coatsville there is a huge dark node there.

#10 wren

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 08:49 PM

So, there are forests that aren't alive? I thought The Forest at Night was a Thing. Let me quote an American Folk Song.

"Black girl, black girl, don't lie to me
Where did you stay last night?
I stayed in the pines where the sun never shines
And shivered when the cold wind blows"

https://www.youtube....h?v=JuJ9aDgQW4c

#11 Wretched

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 09:26 PM

... I wasn't asking about Pennsylvania at all... This thread has nothing to do with that. :huh: Also, having been there, I can say that there are NO SIMILARITIES AT ALL! The trees are different varieties, the animals act differently, the plants are all a different color of green (whe they're green, unlike washington/oregon where it's mosty evergreens.) and to top it off, there are more turkeys than crows in PA from what I've seen, and feels a lot more like turkey turf to me. :P

Hell, even the caves are completely different. These places are not alike.

#12 Morrigan

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 10:09 PM

Quote

Back to the point though. Has anyone else had dealings with, or heard stories of, things relevant to this phenomena? I'd be interested in hearing.

Every city I've ever lived in or visited has this kind of activity. Currently I live in South Florida and I see a great deal of this behavior with Afro-Caribbean Chaos magic styling. When I lived in the North East in West Virginia I experienced a similar vibe to what everyone has described above. The forests were particularity rife with activity and the cities featured a magical culture linked more to Wicca and Pow-wow. There was more urban shamanism there than in SF, unless you consider the wander Mambos and such Urban Shaman?. New York stands out for the number of more Ceremonial types I encountered.

All in all I think that each region of the US has its own particular magical culture. Geography, population density, climate and mundane culture ( particularly the immigrant population) plays a part. I doubt the the Pacific Northwest is unique outside of the factors mentioned above. In fact the liberal, independent minded, more secular population is responsible.

I will note that Aasatru and Nordic folk practices often flourish in more remote areas with a larger white population. The American South has many of these groups, but the Midwest is rife with them ( as rife as Contemporary Pagans can be). Minnesota is not called Paganstan for no reason. Sadly this movement has become popular with the White power fringe movement, who have some footholds in various regions, including the Pacific NW.
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#13 Morrigan

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 10:20 PM

Quote

... I wasn't asking about Pennsylvania at all... This thread has nothing to do with that. :huh: Also, having been there, I can say that there are NO SIMILARITIES AT ALL! The trees are different varieties, the animals act differently, the plants are all a different color of green (whe they're green, unlike washington/oregon where it's mosty evergreens.) and to top it off, there are more turkeys than crows in PA from what I've seen, and feels a lot more like turkey turf to me. :P

You asked folks to share similar experiences and they shared them. You didn't specify that answers had to be limited to the NW. Furthermore your response strikes me dripping of regionalism not to mention inaccurate in terms of animal behavior, geology, and more specifically Corvid population.
Is the goal of this thread to discuss urban magical cultures or is it limited to discussing those culture in the NW?
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The Art of Stealing Fire : My Online Magical Journal
Big mountain, wide river
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Leave our bellies full
They sing out I am going to stand my ground
You rise to me and I'll blow you down
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#14 Tenebrae

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 11:55 PM

View Postwren, on 24 May 2014 - 08:49 PM, said:

So, there are forests that aren't alive? I thought The Forest at Night was a Thing. Let me quote an American Folk Song.

"Black girl, black girl, don't lie to me
Where did you stay last night?
I stayed in the pines where the sun never shines
And shivered when the cold wind blows"

https://www.youtube....h?v=JuJ9aDgQW4c

What I meant is that the entire landscape felt like a single presence. Then again, I suppose every location has a similar feel...but PA left you feeling as though it was actually watching you in particular whereas everywhere else I have been feels apathetic to your presence.

View PostWretched, on 24 May 2014 - 09:26 PM, said:

... I wasn't asking about Pennsylvania at all... This thread has nothing to do with that. :huh: Also, having been there, I can say that there are NO SIMILARITIES AT ALL! The trees are different varieties, the animals act differently, the plants are all a different color of green (whe they're green, unlike washington/oregon where it's mosty evergreens.) and to top it off, there are more turkeys than crows in PA from what I've seen, and feels a lot more like turkey turf to me. :P

Hell, even the caves are completely different. These places are not alike.

Not sure what part of Pennsylvania you've been to...

Turkeys are common, but so too are the crows; perhaps even more so depending upon where you reside. I've lived in Williamsport PA until the age of eighteen and had only seen, perhaps, three gangs of Turkeys...but countless crows. As for evergreens, we have more than enough to leave me with a strong distaste for pine needles! Anyway, of course we're going to have different types of trees and animals...I never claimed otherwise. What I said is that they're similar, you have a mixture and very dense forest system...but ultimately, the point I was making is that they feel akin in terms of having that strange dark aura.

I've never been to the Northwest, so my judgment stems solely from photography of the forests of Oregon and Washington...but when looking at those images, I get the same feeling that I get when I'm back home in PA...or looking at photos of Aokigahara. It's a very different feel than the forests, and landscape, here in South Carolina...there's nothing special about this place, that's for sure. Aokigahara radiates the strongest of these feelings through photos alone...but that may be primarily due to the fact that I already know it has an extremely dark history.

What I want to know is if these locations have something spiritually in common with one another...not go back and forth about the differences regarding flora and fauna. :P

Edited by Tenebrae, 24 May 2014 - 11:57 PM.

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#15 ChaosTech

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 02:26 AM

Here in the Willamette valley, From Portland to Eugene, Oregon, the Indians called this the valley of sickness and death.


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#16 Brennan

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 03:31 AM

Washington/Pacific N.W. never felt eerie or dark to me. It felt.. whole. complete. It acknowledged presences, or at least I felt it acknowledge mine, but in this very warm way. Inclusive, I think, is the ideal word. There was so much life! Also death, but that death is an aspect of living felt emphasized.

#17 Morrigan

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 03:37 AM

Quote

Here in the Willamette valley, From Portland to Eugene, Oregon, the Indians called this the valley of sickness and death.

Actually there is very little to support this idea aside from some very spurious sources. According to most of the information I found the nickname came about more recently due to high concentration of allergy issues and not from a direct translation of Willamette. If the natives did refer to the valley by that name it was the result interaction with White settlers.
http://www.urbanscou...ar-old-culture/
http://wwwhistorical...willamette.html
Cast Wide the Circle: Place for my musings and the occasional book review.
The Art of Stealing Fire : My Online Magical Journal
Big mountain, wide river
There's an ancient pull
These tree trunks, these stream beds
Leave our bellies full
They sing out I am going to stand my ground
You rise to me and I'll blow you down
I am going to stand my ground
You rise to me and I'll blow you down

#18 R. Eugene Laughlin

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 05:11 PM

I suppose we're all subject to personal biases.

The temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest express the living soul of creation to me. They are physically dark because of the denseness and scale of life in them. And the forest floor is thick with decay, but the ongoing cycles in which that decay participates seem a most joyous celebration to me.

I've been awestruck and dumbfounded, even fearful at times, but never for any sense of malice.
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#19 voidgazing

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 06:14 PM

I found Pennsylvania to be quite as Tenebrae describes it, at one time. A particular spot was as dark as the inside of Nox's pockets. I told my friend of this adventure, and he joined me in exploring it. He found it to be that way too although our shared experience did show some marked qualitative differences. Then he and a friend of his went back and found it completely different.

Later experiences taught me this: the area gave me back what I gave it. I was 'dark', it was dark. When I deliberately assume different modes, places give me back different responses- not just the feeling of the place either, but in terms of events. Some of these modes don't resonate with a given location at all, which leads me to the conclusion that what we experience in these terms is a combination of our own vibes and those that the place is predisposed towards.
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#20 RoseRed

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 06:57 PM

Quote

Later experiences taught me this: the area gave me back what I gave it. I was 'dark', it was dark.

And again I say - has anyone been to Scranton?

It doesn't matter what you bring into that place. It's just dark on top of dark.
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