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Baphomet


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#1 Curtis Penfold

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 07:41 AM

What does one do to come in contact with Baphomet?

How is it like to be in contact with Baphomet?

Have you ever come in contact with him/her? What did you do to come in contact with him/her? What was it like?

#2 Imperial Arts

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 08:18 AM

Baphomet is John the Baptist.

Ignorant people have identified it as this other thing on account of Eliphas Levi, who was prone to making up BS whenever he wanted to say something and didn't know what he was talking about. That same ignorance has persisted among occultists to the point where "Baphomet" is currently something altogether different, and the whole subject is a shame to nearly everyone who speaks on the subject.

According to the legend, the Templars discovered the head of John the Baptist, cast in bronze by king Herod, during their campaign in Jerusalem. They kept it, and were later accused of venerating it as an idol. Specifically they were accused of kissing it in a kind of ritual. That practice was later characterized as kissing the Devil himself, on the hind-quarters, along with other accusations of homosexuality and deviant heresies. The Templars were exceedingly rich and powerful, which is another discussion entirely, but that bears mention in regard to where this accusation of idolatry - a crime for which their possessions would be forfeit to the Church - came into their tale.

The entire notion that the Baphomet had any occult connotation whatsoever is propaganda. The demonization of the head, which is described as having eyes set with garnets, served to justify the atrocious treatment visited upon that order by the Pope.

19th century French occultist Eliphas Levi, through his ridiculous but very popular drawing, and through his philosophical reflections on the same, is the origin of most of what you would currently hear about Baphomet in occult circles. The popular Church of Satan image actually comes from a book on the Templars, with the addition of "Leviathan" in Hebrew. None of that has anything to do with the centuries-old concept of the Baphos.

There are other tales of oracular brazen heads in occult literature, curiously over-sized in some instances like the supposed idol of Belial from whence the Sibylline Books were delivered. One author whose name I forget remarked that there are so many instances of talking brazen heads in occult literature that there must have been some substance to the idea, but that substance is lost and largely replaced by allegory.

Edited by Imperial Arts, 07 January 2013 - 08:20 AM.

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"Only the madman is absolutely sure." - Wilson & Shea, Illuminatus!

#3 Curtis Penfold

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 08:27 AM

Though I find the history of Baphomet interesting, I do believe that Levi came in contact with a real force which he identifies as Baphomet. I'd like to know more about that force/being.

#4 voidgazing

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:16 AM

Historical origins aside, it may help Curtis to hear the current conceptions of Baphomet.
This is a postcard sent from the dining room of the HMS Russel's Teapot. Wish you were here- the band is spot on tonight, and we're having "all the way down" turtle soup!

#5 Curtis Penfold

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 06:55 PM

Yes, that's what I'm looking for, a modern understanding of Baphomet. Wikipedia only takes one so far. :P

#6 omera

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 05:29 PM

See, Baphomet already seems scantily defined, but I've been thinking about just formatting the concept of the horned goat of the sabbath to my own purposes. I think that, given my 'black knight' frame of mindset, I could perhaps work to this as a goal of creating my own deity or at least a working symbol. The sun and the moon are important, but perhaps I'll only integrate the 'knight' aspects of these, taking inspiration from Chivalry and whatnot. I think that there are a lot of 'fertile grounds' for LHPers to form their own images from the things vaguely defined as they were in the days of Witch Hysteria.


Perhaps the Devil's Sabbath is not in a forest or desert in the middle of nowhere, and perhaps its participants aren't the secretive neighbors- the heretics around you in the guide of friends and family, etc. I think that the Devil's Sabbath takes place in the heart, and it is the dance between the many demons and cunning sorcerers of self. The fire erupting in the center is the power raised in the mind as a result of that dance, and Baphomet stands before it as the central image of the whole ordeal.

Good scheme for a paradigm, yeah?

Edited by omera, 10 January 2013 - 05:31 PM.

Spide"Cadius the Swift was only a slave, but under the wing of the emperor he was given the highest treatment a slave of messaging could acquire. He descended down the spiraled staircase of that dungeonesque castle and nodded to the guards as he was allowed out. He passed out of the Court of the Black Senate and beyond the defending walls surrounding the tower. The massive structure's only gate groaned wide open, a yawning maw announcing the departure of a traveler from the keep. Necessarily, the gate -was- a maw. As Cadius lightfootedly passed down the main street of Roma Diabolus, he got one glorious look at the daemonic head of Plutonicus glaring out idealistically toward the city's main gate and the vast expanse of an infernally twisted market screamed and yelled about its products before Main Street jutted the black cobblestone tongue of that monstrous symbol into the womb of the world."

#7 Nalyd Khezr Bey

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:28 PM

In The Sufis Idries Shah devotes a short chapter ("The Head of Wisdom") to the subject of Baphomet and attributes the word to a Western corruption of an Arabic word abufihamat. I'll just quote part of it for you:

Quote

Western scholars have recently supposed that "Bafomet" has no connection to Mohammed, but could well be a corruption of the Arabic abufihamat (pronounced in the Moorish Spanish something like bufihimat). The word means "father of understanding." In Arabic, "father" is taken to mean "source, chief seat of," and so on. In Sufi terminology, ras el-fahmat (head of knowledge) means the mentation of man after undergoing refinement - the transmuted consciousness.

It will be noted that the word "knowledge, understanding" used here is derived from the Arabic FHM root. FHM, in turn, is used to stand both for FHM and derivatives, meaning "knowledge;" and FHM and derivatives, standing for "black, Coalman" and so on.

The Baphomet is none other than the symbol of the completed man. The black head, negro head, or the Turk's head which appears in heraldry and in English country-inn signs is a crusader substitute word for this kind of knowledge.
He goes on to discuss various head metaphors but without mentioning the John the Baptist aspect that Imperial Arts mentioned above. However, what IA was talking about has a lot of substance to it whether you take that story as literal fact or not. The head of John the Baptist, the "head of knowledge" or Baphomet, is a cipher for the Johannite Tradition. Some would argue that this is simply a tradition that recognizes John the Baptist as the true messiah instead of Jesus as the Knights Templars appeared to do (on the surface). This was the actual basis for the ideas that filtered through the whole Da Vinci Code fad. However, it's not that simple. The "head of knowledge" is also known as Oannes (hence the name Johannes, John) and represents a certain kind of Gnosis. From there I'll let you research it yourself. I've given you more than enough to consider.

EDIT: Corrected some typos.

Edited by Nalyd Khezr Bey, 10 January 2013 - 09:21 PM.


#8 Curtis Penfold

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 09:05 AM

I would still like to hear more direct experiences with Baphomet.

#9 pan0ptic

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 08:46 PM

View PostNalyd Khezr Bey, on 10 January 2013 - 06:28 PM, said:

In The Sufis Idries Shah devotes a short chapter ("The Head of Wisdom") to the subject of Baphomet and attributes the word to a Western corruption of an Arabic word abufihamat. I'll just quote part of it for you:He goes on to discuss various head metaphors but without mentioning the John the Baptist aspect that Imperial Arts mentioned above. However, what IA was talking about has a lot of substance to it whether you take that story as literal fact or not. The head of John the Baptist, the "head of knowledge" or Baphomet, is a cipher for the Johannite Tradition. Some would argue that this is simply a tradition that recognizes John the Baptist as the true messiah instead of Jesus as the Knights Templars appeared to do (on the surface). This was the actual basis for the ideas that filtered through the whole Da Vinci Code fad. However, it's not that simple. The "head of knowledge" is also known as Oannes (hence the name Johannes, John) and represents a certain kind of Gnosis. From there I'll let you research it yourself. I've given you more than enough to consider.

EDIT: Corrected some typos.

Step outside and take a good look around. Take a deep breath and then look again. That is Baphomet, nature itself.

#10 Curtis Penfold

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Posted 16 September 2013 - 04:43 PM

I'm resurrecting this thread because it's been requested that we make threads about our deities we work with.

Since posting this, I've gained a rich relationship with Baphomet who I've come to love a great deal. Growing up Mormon, I've been taught that God is this Being of Light and Purity and Love. I've learned to hate evil, to fight against it.

Baphomet has taught me to try to accept both the good and the bad, the strong and the weak. For me, Baphomet has come to become the Great Hermaphrodite. He/She represents me as a complete person, containing both good and bad, masculine and feminine, light and dark, weak and strong. He/She also represents the Universe, full of good and evil, living and dead, human and animal. As I grow to love Him/Her, I grow to love every moment, both pleasurable and painful.

At times, Baphomet has come to me in my mind's eye holding a yin yang symbol. Since He/She has taught me to love the moment, I've associated Him/Her with Pan, dancing in the forest. He/She teaches me to let go and love the moment.

Baphomet has also come to me in my mind's eye in the form of the Serpent, who I now view to be the hero in the Adam and Eve story. Here the Serpent was, trying to free us from this false dichotomy of good and evil, male and female, obedience and disobedience. He helps us leave this childish, false utopia and enter a more complicated and unsure world we call Reality.


Since I'm a journalist and an activist, his form as the Serpent has been important for me. He inspires me to bring the knowledge I find to the rest of humanity, to help bring the unknown and uncomfortable to light.


#11 ThoTh

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 03:32 AM

A unique and comprehensive perspective can be found here:
http://thebaphometpr...-hand-path.html

It is in 3 parts.

ISS/h





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