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The Wicker Man


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#41 R. Eugene Laughlin

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 02:00 PM

Magick from my point of view has nothing whatsoever to do with luck. Magick is all about skill, proper application of the right technique, etc. This thread, however, is about a personal religious practice. Magick and religion are naturally inter-related, but they are distinct things for me. Whereas magick is about what I can do for myself, religion is about acknowledging, connecting with, and basking in the awe and wonder of those things in my world that are beyond my capacities to determine. Perhaps that provides the proper context for understanding what I mean when I express that I feel fortunate.
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#42 Reflectionseeker

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 05:56 PM

R. Eugene Laughlin said:

This thread, however, is about a personal religious practice.

I'll get me coat.
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#43 R. Eugene Laughlin

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 06:21 PM

View PostReflectionseeker, on 05 June 2013 - 05:56 PM, said:

I'll get me coat.

Just out of curiosity, you would have otherwise considered a sacrifice in the general sense as a magick but not a religious act?
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#44 Reflectionseeker

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 07:18 PM

Hmmm...there's a crossover, dependent perhaps on what one seeks to acquire: piety, purity, enlightenment - or luck, possessions, affections, and so forth.
Sacrifice in the primitive sense is about securing favours from the gods and is therefore built into religious practice. But I think magic always requires, by various means, a form of sacrifice. Time, energy, maybe even conscience. I personally, despite being more comfortable with the active (magic) than the passive (worship) have been unable to separate the two in ritual; it's like saying thank you before you say please. I'm such a closet Catholic.
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#45 RoseRed

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 07:22 PM

I think it's a beautiful religious practice that takes dedication. Most people can't make 40 days and you make an entire year.
When my wings get tired I grab my broom.

#46 R. Eugene Laughlin

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 10:19 PM

View PostRoseRed, on 05 June 2013 - 07:22 PM, said:

I think it's a beautiful religious practice that takes dedication. Most people can't make 40 days and you make an entire year.

The dedication is somewhat the point, but there are some practical side effects too. One learns to not take things for granted for one thing, and there's a lot of strength available in the simple tangible knowledge of ones ability to commit and to honor a commitment.
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#47 R. Eugene Laughlin

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 10:32 PM

View PostReflectionseeker, on 05 June 2013 - 07:18 PM, said:

Hmmm...there's a crossover, dependent perhaps on what one seeks to acquire: piety, purity, enlightenment - or luck, possessions, affections, and so forth.
Sacrifice in the primitive sense is about securing favours from the gods and is therefore built into religious practice. But I think magic always requires, by various means, a form of sacrifice. Time, energy, maybe even conscience. I personally, despite being more comfortable with the active (magic) than the passive (worship) have been unable to separate the two in ritual; it's like saying thank you before you say please. I'm such a closet Catholic.

The Abrahamic religions stress submission. I can understand why the average occult studies enthusiast is turned off by that general concept, though given the right set of circumstances, submission can be an exceptionally empowering act (but that's a whole other topic). And while I realize I included a phrase in my initial post that suggested a quid pro quo idea, that's not quite how it is for me.

I'm more or less a Neoplatonist, so for me, the gods are impassive. Not only do I assume They don't care what my issues are, I think deity is such an other order of thing that I don't expect "it" to have direct awareness of human life in general, let alone my personal life. If anything, I think it's like the relationship I might have with an individual red corpuscle in my blood stream, or perhaps even some tiny constituent of a red corpuscle that's so minute I don't even know about it.

I do, however, assume that I have the capacity to attune myself to something of what the gods are, some small sliver of Their being that intersects with the life I experience. That's what my religious practices are all about, attuning myself to Them to the degree that I'm able. I don't expect my sacrifices move the gods. I'm that one that's moved.
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#48 RoseRed

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 10:35 PM

Quote

and there's a lot of strength available in the simple tangible knowledge of ones ability to commit and to honor a commitment.

Yes, there is.

Edited by RoseRed, 05 June 2013 - 10:36 PM.

When my wings get tired I grab my broom.

#49 violetstar

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 08:19 PM

View PostR. Eugene Laughlin, on 02 May 2012 - 01:46 PM, said:

Posted Image


It's been my tradition for many years, inspired by the 1973 film I will admit, to make sacrifices at Beltane/May Day, as a devotional act to my Patron Deity, and also to petition for a fruitful growing season and annual harvest, which tends to take on different meanings depending on what's happening in my life. This year, like most, the theme of my petition is career and family. In addition, in recent years it's become clear that as my career progresses, not only am I able to better provide for my family, but my opportunities to advance the state of human knowledge (small increments of course, but still...) tends to increase. I'm particularly seeking for favor in that regard this year.

For me a meaningful sacrifice has to be something that I value, and that will be missed when its gone. So each year I choose something that I have and enjoy in my life on a regular basis, and I give it up for the year, untill the following Beltane. That's perhaps a touch outside of traditional Pagan sacrificial practices, but it has developed into a profoundly moving personal tradition for me.



Posted Image
I absolutely LOVE this R E L,

Edited by violetstar, 17 March 2017 - 08:21 PM.

To face a real daemon, you must first look inwards and conquer your own darkness.Luis Marques

#50 Spida

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 04:27 PM

I tend to feel sympathy for the Wicker Man. That thing was cute.
Since no thing defines it's own creation. It cannot be held responsible for it's nature; then there are choices.

#51 violetstar

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 04:31 PM

Some things are regrettable but as it was said 'For the greater Good'.
To face a real daemon, you must first look inwards and conquer your own darkness.Luis Marques





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