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Native Fae


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#1 Alice

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 02:56 AM

Anyone heard of the Nan A Push? It means "Little People of the Forest". Apparently there are Native American myths about the fae, and I'm curious if anyone has any more information than that.

May you find what you seek,
Alice

#2 ChaosTech

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 03:30 AM

https://www.google.c....1169.9j3.12.0.

Lot's of interesting links. :)


For nearly 20 years I meditated on and studied that which has no name, but is absolute, infinite, beyond both small and large. Finally one day I realized the limits of my sentient consciousness. It has all power over whether we are it or dual. There is no choice of the nondual, for choice is dual. Just be, live, do what you will, with love and wisdom. As Hermes said, in a time yet unborn, all shall be one, and one shall be all. True enlightenment has nothing to do with attainment. It's an inner peace, that there is nothing to be done, I call it surrender to the Spirit.

#3 Guest_Reilus_*

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 06:03 AM

I heard stories, but the one that is most believable to me is the Elves from Hyperspace. People who undertake certain psychedelic practices often comment on Elves. I once saw a green man juggling in my bedroom after doing brainwave exercises. I woke up after doing some idoser thing and I saw this green dude in my bedroom juggling at smiling. I yelled "HOLY SHIT!" It woke my wife up, but, of course, he disappeared. It reminded me of the Gamma Goblins from Hyperspace or the Elves from Hyperspace -- it's a bit different to hear different psychedelicists tell it, but I saw the little green guy and he was having a great time. I hope to meet him again someday. =) So, while I don't know about faeries, elves, or goblins, I saw something that could be mistaken for that.

If I were in a court of law, I would say that I think it was an animus projection brought on through the brainwaves. The question then becomes, is it elementargedanken or volkergedanken?

#4 Brennan

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 07:05 AM

I don't know how the various tribes or nations view fae.. but, I am familiar with the land spirits in some traditionally sacred areas. I live in Minnesota, near the land that was the territory of the Ojibwe peoples. The 'strongest(?)' spirit here that I am familiar with is within Lake Superior. The forests of Itasca are also.. very strong, in the same regard.

What I have come to learn to identify as fae, here anyway, are the spirits which oversee and care for the development of environment. In some conversations that I've had, it has been eluded to that they live in the 'flow of fate' and tend to the 'foundation of existence'... If a relationship is forged, they have been known to pass on their knowledge of magick, but they may not see it as such.

In form, I have come to understand that these beings are indistinguishable from the Kami of Shinto or Kamuy, in the Ainu language and... some can be rather difficult to understand from what is typically understood to be the human perspective. I'll leave it off at this, as I don't feel particularly inclined to rant on. heh.

Edited by Brennan, 25 April 2012 - 07:05 AM.


#5 Michael

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 07:46 AM

Alice.... this may not be exactly what you were looking for, but under "Spirit Guides", in the Working with Fairies thread, I posted an account titled "High Strangeness at the Hole". You might find it to be an interesting read.....

Michael

#6 Caliban

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 08:55 AM

There are a lot of different regional variations on these. The ones I am most aware of are the Nunnehi, who are essentially the Good Neighbors (bless Them) known to the Cherokee. It would not surprise me to learn that some had made the long walk west.

The Ojibwe shared the general outlook of the Algonquian peoples generally. "Manitou" is more or less translatable as "spirit" in both the sense of numinous quintessence or magical force as well as the particular tutleary personification of a place or thing.

This is really not my area of expertise, but I imagine it is reasonably well-documented.

Edited by Caliban, 25 April 2012 - 09:02 AM.


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#7 Iago

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 10:21 PM

View PostAlice, on 25 April 2012 - 02:56 AM, said:

Anyone heard of the Nan A Push? It means "Little People of the Forest". Apparently there are Native American myths about the fae, and I'm curious if anyone has any more information than that.

May you find what you seek,
Alice
"Native American" is a rather broad term, do you know which nation/s specifically have this Nan A Push tradition?

Also the self-transforming clockwork machine elves from hyperspace (or whatever the heck you wanna call them) seem to have a sort of connection to all spiritual entities, perhaps being the side of them only knowable under certain extreme altered states.

SCIENTIAM SAPIENTIS, SAPIENTIAM PVER

‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡

The gods, they are but masks. Who is wearing them?


#8 Alice

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 10:33 PM

Thanks all for the input. I just thought it was an interesting topic.

Michael, your stories are always interesting, so when I get a little time for such a long read I'll definitely partake, thanks.

Quote

"Native American" is a rather broad term, do you know which nation/s specifically have this Nan A Push tradition?

Unfortunately no. I happened on it in something written by Brian Froud.


May you find what you seek,
Alice

Edited by Alice, 25 April 2012 - 10:35 PM.


#9 Nalyd Khezr Bey

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 08:38 AM

Where did you get that definition of "nanapush"? I tried searching around for it not only online but in various books I have. Nothing in the books. The only references to that word I can find are online and it seems to only be a fictional character in a book titled Tracks by Louise Erdrich (see HERE). The character appears to be a trickster figure and leader of a tribe based on the actual Ojibwe trickster Nanabozho.

Of course the trickster figure is extent in Native American lore in general. These beings come in various guises, usually as animals. The trickster would be the equivalent of the beings described in fairy lore. For example, in the area I live I am surrounded by the Cahokia Birdman, Piasa Bird and Thunderbird. Something about these mythical birds (fairies?) around here.

#10 aoz

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 08:41 AM

never heard much about them, except from oral tradition. the man was a half cherokee, half german storyteller

#11 Alice

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 04:57 PM

Quote

Unfortunately no. I happened on it in something written by Brian Froud.

Faeries, by Brian Froud and Alan Lee.

May you find what you seek,
Alice

#12 QuercusRobur

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 10:00 AM

Is that the same Alan Lee who's done art work on The Lord of the Rings?
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#13 Alice

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 05:10 PM

I suspect so.

I'm not familiar with Lee's work, but of course Froud is a very gifted artist who claims to have personally seen the fae and that many of his artistic works are portraits, not fantasy pieces.

May you find what you seek,
Alice





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