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What is the most accurate Holy Bible translation to date?


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#1 SilentJoy

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 11:41 AM

Or MAYBE a more appropriate question might be: Which version of the Holy Bible is most compatible with the Gnostic texts/Esoteric Christianity?

I'm currently looking for a Bible so I can finally read it, for both literary and spiritual value.
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#2 Adoniram

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 03:21 PM

New Interpreter's Study Bible is my favorite edition.

However, if you want to be a purist the Septuagint for the Old Testament is closest to the original intent of the authors and is quite profound to anyone with esoteric Christian/gnostic leanings.

Edit: I forgot to mention that the NISB includes the Apocrypha.

#3 Poimandres

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 03:38 PM

Any Study Bible is your best bet. I personally prefer the NSRV Study Bible put out by Harper Collins as it has extensive historical footnotes and comparisons between the different versions.

In terms of Gnostic and Esoteric Christianity you really should also be looking at the gospels of Thomas, Phillip, Judas,Pistis-Sophia, and other such texts not included in the Bible. These are to be found primarily in the Nag Hammadi archives.

Unfortunately, much is lost in translation. The best way to study the Bible is to learn to read Hebrew and Greek. You'll be amazed at how stripped down the text has become once translated into the vernacular. Simple things stick out like the various names of God used in the Hebrew version that are indiscriminately all reduced to "God" or "Lord" and the translation of the Greek logos to simply "word" which barely scratches the real meaning behind the term.

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#4 Morrigan

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 04:59 PM

A Vulgate Bible is always an interesting read if one knows Latin. Poimandres is right on, learn to read a little Latin and Greek and you'll be amazed at how striped down and faulty an English translation is.
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#5 jes

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 06:20 PM

What might work well is if you read a regular bible along with "How to Read the Bible" by James Kugel. In this book he includes the priceless insight of both modern scholars and ancient interpreters to help you get a new perspective on the bible or a first one if you are just starting to read it.
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#6 SilentJoy

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 12:01 AM

Thank you for the suggestions! Some of these seem to be what I'm looking for.


Also, I was interested in learning some Hebrew/Greek to better understand the scripture, but I'm confused... Which language are the primary texts written in?

If I knew those two language, what does that leave? I know there's Aramaic and Latin, but I don't know if I can tackle 4 languages o.O

Bah, idk.

The extent of my knowledge is really limited on this subject.
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#7 Poimandres

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 12:48 AM

SilentJoy said:

Thank you for the suggestions! Some of these seem to be what I'm looking for.


Also, I was interested in learning some Hebrew/Greek to better understand the scripture, but I'm confused... Which language are the primary texts written in?

If I knew those two language, what does that leave? I know there's Aramaic and Latin, but I don't know if I can tackle 4 languages o.O

Bah, idk.

The extent of my knowledge is really limited on this subject.

Hebrew for the Old Testament (though a few of the chapters where written in Aramaic) and Greek for the New Testament. The gospels of the Nag Hammadi were written in Coptic (though evidence suggests they were translated from Greek originals). Latin is the first vernacular translation and it is with Latin that you get some of the major generalizations (i.e. YHVH, ADNI, ELHM, etc. to Dominus and gk. logos to verbum).

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