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Palo Mexica


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#1 teopiltzin

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 02:11 PM

As a syncretist, I have to say that although I am faithful to the nahua religion, I will not hesitate to take from other systems of a magico-religious nature. My search is for a path of liberation, and only by liberally taking from each system one has encountered and molding it into a new synthesis could we harness the true power that lay before us as humans. Next I will tell you about my own new synthesis which if applied correctly can lead to many interesting developments.

My practice is what I refer to as Palo Mexica, a system which takes liberally from the Afro-Caribbean current but focuses primarily on the worship and adoration of the Aztec gods. I take from Palo Mayombe the practice of setting up a nganga, prenda, or caldero. This is a pot in which many natural materials are placed which hold magical properties which can be harnessed by the nahualli if worked with in the proper way.

The first thing you need to do is find out what kind of prenda you should build by finding out which are the Aztec powers that govern over your existence. This information can be found at http://azteccalendar.com. Once you know what god presides both the trecena and day of your birth, you will immediately know which god you should focus your prenda on. You should then pick from the two to see which is the one you connect with the most.

You need to astral travel or shamanic journey to the gods or god shaping your life. One should ask very carefully and with much humility about what natural or man-made materials they want you to put into your prenda. Having received this information through either telepathy or psychometry techniques, you are now ready to begin constructing your prenda or cauldron, as it is often called.

Traditionally, in Palo Mayombe, one often sees metallic pots big enough to place objects or materials such as rocks, herbs, feathers, maize, sticks, and earth, among other things. A powerful mexica palero or nahualli will usually place things such as bullets, nails, special oils and other man-made materials in his prenda. These usually represent anything you wish to work with, whether it be people, deities, spirits, or abstract concepts such as servitors, sigils, and egregores.

I personally use a clay pot in which a traditional Mexican house-hold would bake beans in. In this pot I hold earth from different power spots such as the forest, the coast, the desert, and from around your own home as a petition to the local spirits to look after your pot. When focusing on your altar, you may have certain associations or thought-forms that come to mind when thinking about the different places you've been on your adventure of filling this pot.

I also use sticks from anywhere I could find. Herbs like Rue, Mint, Bay, Pine cones, and small pebbles also give your altar an added kick. I am no yierbero, but I do know that everything that has once had life also has a spirit. Filling your prenda with the essence or small portion of each substance is the shamanic equivalent of gathering spirit helpers. You don't have to plead to these spirits, for you only gathered the essence of it, not the spirit of the entire plant species. Graveyard dirt makes this cauldron very sensitive to the spirits of the dead and should be employed. You could use church dirt for the opposite effect.

One would work with these spirit helpers astrally by scrying either with eyes opened or closed over the surface of your prenda. It is useful to have a lid for the pot so that when it's closed, it symbolizes inactivity and rest, which gives the spirits you have gathered some time to recover. I use turkey bones in my prenda because my patron god is Chalchiuhtotlin, the Jeweled Fowl or Turkey, god of liberation, god cleansing of self-contamination, but also the god of pestilence, which is the nahualli of Tezcatlipoca.

The turkey bones, in my case, form the basis of my worship for you could astrally resuscitate the spirit of that particular bird and reanimate its abilities, instincts and memories of that bird. It DNA which resides in the bones can be used to astrally or etherically reconstruct its spirit body for use as a power animal or nahualli, an astral vehicle to dream through as well as a vehicle to generally transfer your consciousness into such a vehicle.

This could be done with any animal, plant, rock, or element placed in your pot. Once the pot is full, you could place it on the floor next to your door at the entrance in order to protect your family, or it can stay at your altar if you want to work with it more actively. It is a spirit bomb that serves both to protect and to work on your behalf independent of the operator's intent or even presence. You could send your prenda off to do odd jobs for you, to gather information, to do things to people whether good or bad, as well as to simply accumulate power for knowledge, health, and spiritual healing.

Find out what the gods or deities you want to serve like as offerings and include that in or next to your prenda. As a result of these offerings, or in the case of petitions to certain gods or spirits that have a connection to your prenda, you should expect results rather rapidly. The cauldron itself has a unique spirit body which can be manipulated by passing your hands over its aura and shaping it. This aura is in such a high vibrational frequency that it can only be perceived by the Third Eye in a highly sensitive psychic state.

To empower your prenda, memorize the name of everything you put in and chant its names and properties as well as cries to the Aztec god you pray to while you use ecstatic methods to reach a trance state or gnosis, whichever you'd prefer. This adds an extra punch to its power and now you are ready to mold its spirit body into any conceivable physical form by molding it with your hands and the power of your mind. You could give it shape of an animal or any living, sentient or semi-sentient being.

You could launch this new vehicle or personal alter ego to any location in the galaxy and either follow it, become it, or let it go on its own to do the work. You could produce spirit bombs that could be sent through the hands once physically shaping the orbs or balls through magical passes over the altar. They could be gathered and sent by a violent motion of your hands in any of the four directions. If you know which direction the victim or patient lives in, you could launch it in that directions.

Once you have established a relationship with your New Power bestowed on you by your cauldron, you are ready to use the nawales of the sacred Cholq'ij calendar and to practice journeycraft and dreaming. You could do many additional things with your prenda, such as burying it in a remote location of power for a few days, weeks, months, or even years so that they may accumulate powers independent of any operator. Once you unearth it, you must invoke the spirit of the place you buried it in every time you use it, or every time you wake up (once back at your home).

The easiest form of spirit to capture or control through your prenda are the Cihuateteo. In ancient aztec myth, there are certain minor deities or spirits that visit us in the real world on particular days in the Cholq'ij calendar. First, the Cihuateteo who are believed to be the souls of deified mortal women who died in childbirth. They were said to cause sicknesses and tempt men to sexual misconduct. There is a brighter side to them for in aztec culture women who died in child birth were revered as warriors on par with any male warrior that has died in battle.

They were worshipped as ancestors in the Cihuateocalli built at a crossroads. They are known as the goddesses of the crossroads. The days on which they were to descend to earth are 1-Manik, 1-Cauac, 1-Chuen, 1-Akbal, and 1-Men. They were associated with the five trecenas of the West. On these days the veils or barriers between ordinary and non-ordinary reality are much thiner, much like the effect of Samhain or Halloween over the spirit world. Spirits from the underworld of Mictlan, the land of the dead, come up to the earth on these particular days and either help or wreak havoc across the land.

The Cihuateteo are spirits of illness and disease, but their powers and knowledge can be used to diagnose the cause of illness and to treat different diseases, particularly palsy and psychological illnesses like hearing voices and chronic depression. Of course, you must make offerings to the Cihuateteo on these days to achieve control of their powers. They must be made allies through the power of the your caldero and should be visited through shamanic journeys and lucid dreams.

They are indeed the weakest of the aztec gods and have a limited effect when not summoned on the correct days. But you could capture one or two on the day 1-Rain, which is when the youngest and most beautiful, as well as the most powerful, are brought to earth. Remember, they were once human, therefore they are pure nahualli and teyolia. The nahualli or mexica palero can use these powers to either cure or hex. But I would strongly oppose using these abilities for evil, and instead using them to gain knowledge and wisdom about the spirit world and how it blends, interacts with the world of the physical.

It is said that a shaman can only cure the diseases which he tasted under initiation. Be prepared, because if you summon these spirits, you will at first be enemies for they are legendarily packed with raw human emotion of hatred and sadness, because they suffered so much during their life-time and death. They are warriors nonetheless and if you try to build a positive relationship with them once you have called upon them, and if you succeed, you will be able to channel all their knowledge about illnesses they cause in order to cure them. Their specialty is "rape of the soul" or "stealing souls."

Once you are ready to say good-bye to this spirit once all of its work has been accomplished, you must do a shamanic journey to Mictlan, across the nine underworlds, in order to play psychopomp so you may take them personally to receive eternal rest as a reward for their working with you. An offering for an offering. These are creatures that regularly haunt people on those days because of their rage about how they died so tragically, but if you could help them find peace with themselves and harmonize them, their soul departs and stays in Mictlan forever. One must of course respect these spirits and only use them when absolutely necessary.

So this is a part of how Palo Mexica works. I wish I knew more about the subject and I know I am not that articulate, but as someone that is not a professional writer, I am going to do my best to delineate my system fuller in the future. There are many, many more ways to incorporate worship of the aztec gods with the Cholq'ij and journeycraft. But i'll save that for another thread or reply.

Yours in the struggle,
--Teopiltzin

Edited by teopiltzin, 14 June 2010 - 12:47 PM.


#2 Caliban

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 08:38 PM

I know just enough about this kind of thing that this is a fascinating read. I wish I had more I could say in way of meaningful reply. Interesting that you are innovating this way, but what could be more appropriate for a devotee of Smoking Mirror in his aspect as Lord of Sorcery?

I will be reading your posts with great interest. I wish I knew enough to make intelligent comments. Keep up the good work. :D


"There is a crack, a crack through everything. That is how the light gets in." -- Leonard Cohen


#3 teopiltzin

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 09:43 PM

Caliban: thank you for your warm reply. It's very difficult for me to put into words my experience with Palo Mexica. Up until now there are no initiation rituals attached to it but i'm waiting for Spirit to guide me towards what such an initiation would look like. I will continue posting to this thread as opposed to making different threads so as not to clutter the forum with threads. Replies to this one are enough. It will be a kind of blog on my current developments with this new tradition of Palo which is not mature to say the least, but due to the influence of Chaos Magick on me, my attitude leans towards deconstruction and experimentation with different techniques. There's a lot I could write about, but I'll save it for a later date. Again, Caliban, i'm glad you enjoyed the post.

Yours in the struggle,
--Teopiltzin

Edited by teopiltzin, 12 June 2010 - 11:51 PM.


#4 teopiltzin

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 04:01 PM

from Wikipedia:

Quote

Tlaloc (Classical Nahuatl: Tlālōc [ˈtɬaːloːk]) was an important deity in Aztec religion, a god of rain, fertility, and water. He was a beneficent god who gave life and sustenance, but he was also feared for his ability to send hail, thunder and lightning, and for being the lord of the powerful element of water. In Aztec iconography he is normally depicted with goggle eyes and fangs. He was associated with caves, springs and mountains.

In Aztec cosmology, the four corners of the universe are marked by "the four Tlalocs" (Classical Nahuatl: Tlālōquê [tɬaːˈloːkeʔ]) which both hold up the sky and functions as the frame for the passing of time. Tlaloc was the patron of the Calendar day Mazatl and of the trecena of Ce Quiahuitl (1 Rain). In Aztec mythology, Tlaloc was the lord of the third sun which was destroyed by fire.

I quoted the above because it seemed like the adequate introduction to what I will be discussing herein. Some of what I write is paraphrased from the research I have done, mostly from Wikipedia. For the sake of transparancy, I will put it in quotes. It is necessary background information, but the information was already available, so there you go. As they say, "Nothing is true--Everything is permitted."

Quote

If Tlaloc were to get up from his throne in Tlalocan and work his magick on his own, it would be because he is either angered at the people or if humanity was in a crises that demanded his help and power. Ancient nahuallis of the second-cycle would go to Tlalocan in a lucid dream state in order to weather work to either bring rains for the crops to grow or on the flip side to cause doughts and famines (which is not recommended if you are a modern nahualli with an inclination towards white magick).

However, a modern nahualli would approach this type of weather working in a different way. There were or current are beings, entities that are known as the Tlaloques who were or are the attendants or helpers of Tlaloc and his representatives on this earth. Theoretically, there could be hundreds of thousands of Tlaloques all over the world, but tradition recognizes four: Blue Tlaloque, White Tlaloque, Yellow Tlaloque, and Red Tlaloque, each represented by one of the four cardinal points or direction.

Tlaloques are in charge of spreading the rain across the earth in their pots or vessels. For it to rain, it is said that these Tlaloques had to break or shatter their pots filled with the water for the earth. Lighting is the sound the vessels make when they are shattered in order to bring rain. They brought beneficial rain; fungus rain; windy rain; fiery rain which may have symbolized drought and flint-blade rain which may have symbolized hailstorms.

Tlaloques are thought to have brought illness to the people associated with cold winds, including dropsy, leprosy, and rhematism. People that died as a result of contact with these forces of nature such as drowning, being hit by a lighting bolt among other things were said to bring one, upon death, to the earthly paradise of Tlalocan, a place of endless spring and abundance of all. These Tlaloques are said to be the gods of the mountains, clouds, lighting, and thunder.

Some of the other gods associated with the weather are: Atl, god of water; Atlacaman, goddess of oceanisc storms such as hurricanes; Atlaua, another water god; Ayauhateotl, goddess of mist, fog, vanity, and fame; Chalchiuhtlotonal, water god; Chalchiutlicue, goddess of lakes and streams, as well as the ocean, wife of Tlaloc.

Xiuhcoatl is another interesting deity with regards to the weather. He is the creation of Xiuhtecuhtli, the fire god, the first god, the old god. The word itself means turquoise serpent or fire serpent. He was the spear that Huitzilopochtli would use to strike at his enemies on earth. He would use it to cause famine or a dry season.

Much like Zeus would throw thunderbolts down to earth, as did the Sun god. As god of drought and famine, this is one god not to be crossed for he is associated with fire and solar heat and the rays of the sun. But he could also end famines and droughts, so I guess there is a bright side to this god.

In Palo Mexica, there are two ways or two rituals that could summon the power of these deities. One is creating a rain vessel of your own and the other is by creating a rattlestaff. The vessel can be a clay pot or it could be made from any other fragile material. I'll explain the reason why later. The rattlestaff represent the tail of Xiuhcoatl and can act as a spear similar to that of the shaman-kings that wielded a spear of their own.

The very first thing you need to do is to astral travel or shamanic journey to the paradise of Tlalocan. There you will try to find the four Tlaloques in order to communicate with them your needs and what you would like to ask of them. To reach Tlalocan, you must first picture yourself (astrally) besides a violently spinning whirlpool. You will wait until the pool is spinning at its peak level of velocity and then jump in. You could do this either in your astral temple or garden, or just at some body of water you've been to and are familiar with. It also works anywhere else, for example, your room.

Once you have jumped into the vortex. You will of course find yourself spinning and spinning until you become totally delirius. The intent you should focus your will on can be represented by the affirmation: "Take me to Tlalocan." Repeat this to yourself as you are going down this whirlpool. At some point the delirium will cease and water will slow down as you reach an aquatic underworld that you must pass through in order to get to Tlalocan.

You will be swimming within a water filled set of caves that you must maneuver around until you find someone that could help you. You will see many animals, but be weary of aquatic monsters or fish or sharks (unless you would like to make them your familiars). Eventually, as you swim, you will find a human being that you could ask telepathically or through hand gestures as to where is the entrance to Tlalocan.

Once you get pointed in the right direction you will continue to swim until you find an opening at the bottom of body of water. Swim straight down towards the entrance you find and you will suddenly feel like you've been turned upside down (180 degree shift) and fall into a cave or forest, depending on who gave you directions. You could have also used the animals, but that's a personal choice up to you.

In my experience, I find a cave and fly around it at optimum speeds so as to not waste any time. You will eventually find an entrance into to Tlalocan for you will meet many people and beings as you look around the terrain. Mostly, you will come into contact with diviners working with maize kernels on a straw mat or petate, or artisans selling the crafts to passerbys. Everything looks dark, but if you get close to a person you find some light. There you could ask for a divination of your own or trade gifts with spirits and communicate about what you're trying to accomplish in Tlalocan.

If you make it to the entrance, what I have personally seen is a metropolis of connected households and pyramids, a place where there is always light. There many rivers and streams that interconnect with the mountains there. You must ask in what direction are the Tlaloques. Assuming that there are only four, you could find the center of the metropolis, ask where each direction is located, and fly into the four directions until you find a Tlaloque.

Once, I foolishly tried to attack a Tlaloque and steal his dress and equipment, which included blood red sandals, rattles, and a vessel full of the power of water. This was a serious mistake. The next night I had a nightmare where I came face to face with Tlaloc himself, which was the most terrifying experience I have ever had. I had to give it back and make a big offering to that Tlaloque (of the West) and make a sacrifice. I chose to stop smoking and drinking alcohol and being celibate for 260 days (nine months). But through praying, pleading for forgiveness, and humility, I was absolved of my crime.

I did however gain some understanding of how a Tlaloque works, which is mentioned above. The key to aztec weather working is to imitate the actions of a Tlaloque well enough to gain the respect of a Tlaloque here on earth, and maybe he will share some of his knowledge and experience with you, which you could transform into wisdom. You could try becoming an incarnation of a Tlaloque, with the gods' permission, in order to imitate how he does his work.

In order to be a Tlaloque (temporarily as a paradigm shift or meta-belief system and invocation) You must first dress like one. Again, blood red sandals, your body painted blue your eyes and mouth painted crimson red wearing nothing but a loin cloth. Also, you must carry a medicine bundle filling with objects represented what you have traded for or gifts received on your adventures in Tlalocan.

As a Tlaloque, you need a rattlestaff to control the powers of Xiuhcoatl with the permission of Huitzilopochtli and Xiuhtecutli (you might need to astral travel to them in their own paradises or levels of the upperworld in order to make this possible.) A rattlestaff can be constructed using a human sized but rather thin walking stiff with gourds or rattles tied to the top. I myself use goat nails and bones tied into mine with great results when shaking it thoroughly. The stick is painted blue and the rattles blood red.

A simple weather working ritual with a rattlestaff is to wait for a day in the Cholq'ij calendar on which Tlaloc presides, such as the day Manik or the trecena 1-Cauac. Draw a circle on the ground and draw a cross in it, representing both the four directions and a sorcerer's circle of protection. Shake a handheld rattle on your left hand and the rattlestaff on your right hand. Shake your rattles over smoldering myrrh and copal smoke on charcoal. As you do this, shake the rattle over the copal into the four directions as you continue shaking them.

Next, stand back in your circle and invoke the four Tlaloques, Tlaloc, and Xiuhcoatl. Any invented prayer will do, depending on what type of weather you might want to manifest. Spin around in your circle as you rattle both power objects and ask of these spirits to offer you a small portion of their power. Next get down on your hands and knees holding your rattlestaff with both arms up high, and in a trance state or frenzy, you yell out a massive cry for the deities you are working with. Try to actually cry but be sincere.

You are asking one of the most feared gods in the aztec pantheon for his power, permanently. Then as you are on your hands and knees, pray as you astral travel directly to Tlaloc's thrown and get for forgiveness of all your sins and plead to him that you are sincere. Then stand and scry Tlaloc's thrown up in the sky (assuming it's dark, best at midnight). He will give you either an angry message or a supportive message. If you succeed, Your rattlestaff will be infused with weather working power. If you were born on days when Tlaloc presides, you may shake your rattlestaff at the foot of your prenda or altar so that you may make any change in atmospheric phenomena.

Next, you must get a clay pot and let rain fill it up. This may take some time during a rainy season. You could shake your rattlestaff before your pot to ask that it gets filled. When you want to affect the weather, simply break the pot with your rattlestaff and rain will fall. In conjunction with shamanic journeying to Tlalocan, timing your rituals through the Cholq'ij, and any innovation you might add, you are guaranteed succes.

According to the Maya, there are certain days on the calendar on which rain-making ceremonies should be enacted.

From the book of chilam balam

Instructions for the C'ha Chac Rain Making Ceremonies:

It was 13 days until 3 Ix when he sidled east. It's about time for rain. It is tortoise bread (offering to be made).

It was 13 days until 3 Manik when he sidled north. It's about time for rain. It is fish.

It was 13 days until 3 Ahau when he sidled west. It's about time for rain. It is iguana bread.

It was 13 days until 3 Ben when he sidled south. It's about time for rain. It is wild turkey bread.

Decoded, the days exactly are:
3-Imix
3-Ix
3-Manik
3-Ahau
3-Ben

Suggested Reading: Weather Shamanism; The Dialogue of Earth and Sky: Dreams, Souls, Curing, and the Modern Aztec Underworld

Yours in the struggle,
--Teopiltzin

Edited by teopiltzin, 14 June 2010 - 05:42 PM.


#5 priestess

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 05:05 PM

Interesting take on Palo.

#6 teopiltzin

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 07:48 PM

This is a simple adaptation of the traditional CM Middle Pillar Ritual for practitioners of Palo Mexica using the six names of Tezcatlipoca:

First, imagine an orb of dark purple light hovering over your head. Concentrate on it for a bit as you gather earth and bodily energies into it. Once it's fully in focus and in your crown chakra, bring it down to your head and vibrate Yoalli Ehecatl. Feel it burn through your head as though a lightning bolt were lightly introduced into your body. Then bring the orb of light down to you neck and let it sit for a while, and then vibrate Tloque Nahuaque.

Then bring this orb down to your chest and let it flow through your arms, to your hands, and to your fingers. If done properly, at this point, you feel your blood jumping particularly the tips of your fingers. Vibrate Titlacahun. Bring it down to your navel chakra and vibrate Necoc Yaotl. Then bring the orb of light down to your waist and vibrate Telpochtli.

Then bring it down to your feet and vibrate Moquequeloa. Once you have vibrated all of the names of Tezcatlipoca, you are ready to do what you wish with this energy that has been raised. You could focus this energy through your hands and throw chi/ki balls in any direction. Or you could perform it in a dream or shamanic journey if somebody is giving you trouble or if you're having a lucid nightmare/night terrors.

You could launch your energy into any direction or simply focus this new energy on any part of your body. Doing it while in a personal cone of power can give your spells an added punch. If you have an illness of some kind of localized pain, you could treat it by focusing this force in particular parts of you body. If you have a spirit intrusion or evil spirit in or around you, you could concentrate on its spirit body and exorcise it by forcing it out through this technique, possibly through your navel, your chest, or the top of your head.

The pillar represents the world tree or the ceiba tree sacred throughout all of mesoamerica. We become a microcosm of the sacred tree, the axis mundi of the three worlds.

#7 teopiltzin

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Posted 14 June 2010 - 08:21 PM

The following is based on the LBRP and QC with minor changes.

Step 1-First, you will need either a wand or an athame, preferably an obsidian knife. Imagine a purple light hovering over your head. Take the obsidian blade and bring down the ball of light down to your forehead and vibrate Xiuhtecuhtli. Bring the blade down to your waist and vibrate Huehueteotl. Now bring it up to your left shoulder and vibrate Ometecuhtli, then bring to to your right shoulder and vibrate Omecihuatl. Now hold the blade to your chest with both hands together and say Tahtll.

Step 2-Next, draw an astral circle around yourself with the blade turning counter-clockwise 9 times until the astral cord is tight, which is what you are going to hang the aztec crosses in, which represent the world tree and the four directions. Face your altar or working surface and draw a large cross (while you astrally view it as a cross of black smoke) with your blade and perform the sign of the enterer, that is take a step forward and throw your hands into the cross and scream Quetzalcoatl. You do this so that gods can truly hear you. Screams reverberate through the spirit world if you have a foot in both worlds. Do the same for each direction, screaming Huitzilopochtli in the next direction, then Xipe Totec, then Tezcatlipoca (which are the four Tezcatlipocas that created the universe).

Step 3-Put your arms out in front of you with your hands pointing at your altar and say: "In the name of the nine aztec powers, the 13 aztec powers, let there be no spirit but these that dwell around me in glory and immaculate beauty, O lord of near and night, for around me is the cross."

Then repeat step 1 and you're done. Feel free to experiment with other aztec gods.

#8 Starbeast

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 05:39 AM

Your journeying stuff is cool, adapting the LBRP to Aztec gods - not so much. If you're doing an Aztec paradigm, try writing an Aztec banishing ritual instead of adapting a Jewish/Hermetic one with minor changes. (Sign of the Enterer, with Aztecs, seriously?) It'd fit the paradigm better, and you would see better results. I really am not a fan of LBRP knockoffs in contexts where they do not fit...if it's all gonna be Aztec Chaos it should be labeled as such.

But then, chaos involves more technique than just throwing it all in a pot and being leetcore, too :P Sorry for the rant...just a pet peeve here.

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#9 teopiltzin

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 05:58 AM

Yes I understand that, but I use to do the LBRP, so a knockoff would be appropriate. "Steal everything in sight," I usually say. If it works it works. What's important is invoking the aztec gods, they don't mind how, at least in my experience. As a revolutionary nahualli, I take from other systems what I could. Ancient aztec sorcery is a lost art and has to be reconstructed from ashes of oral traditions and creative innovation. Btw the pot works. Google "Palo Mayombe Prenda" and you'll see what i mean. My practice is basically folk magick, but my attitude is Chaos. But I don't believe in Chaos! I believe in a predetermined universe as did the Aztecs. The aztec MP and LBRP works. That's all that matters. But I do respect your opinion. I'll go on with practicing it though. I don't think the aztecs did banishing rituals!

It is aztec chaos!

Peace.

#10 Starbeast

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 06:04 AM

teopiltzin said:

Yes I understand that, but I use to do the LBRP, so a knockoff would be appropriate. "Steal everything in sight," I usually say. If it works it works. What's important is invoking the aztec gods, they don't mind how, at least in my experience. As a revolutionary nahualli, I take from other systems what I could. Ancient aztec sorcery is a lost art and has to be reconstructed from ashes of oral traditions and creative innovation. Btw the pot works. Google "Palo Mayombe Prenda" and you'll see what i mean. My practice is basically folk magick, but my attitude is Chaos. But I don't believe in Chaos! I believe in a predetermined universe as did the Aztecs. The aztec MP and LBRP works. That's all that matters. But I do respect your opinion. I'll go on with practicing it though. I don't think the aztecs did banishing rituals!

It is aztec chaos!

Peace.

I can follow that - but at the point you start shoehorning Aztec gods into the LBRP the LBRP ceases to be the well-defined unit it was at the beginning, for one - and at the point you start shoehorning the LBRP into Aztec gods it ceases to be any type of Palo. I have a friend who's into that and I can assure you the prenda does indeed work ^^

But in any case the Microcosm, the Mage is the equation, not the system - as always, whatever works is exactly what you should go with mon ^^

:cool: TAU
AwesomeJon 37 unveiled: 04/06/10...the Conversation continues :) Xeper is no longer a useful concept - but Awesome still is.

Nothing stops me! I've got an awesome 'tude for an awesome dude and I'm actually seriously practicing...the world is within my grasp!

Call me Jon ^^

http://liberverendus.wordpress.com/ The action happens here....in the Book of Awesome! :D

And always remember...keep it heavy! \m/\m/

#11 malah777

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 04:12 AM

Honestly , I don't know much about Aztec Sorcery .But !
I very much enjoyed your material on Pala Mexica &
look forward to reading more from you ....

"Only those who have dared to let go can dare to reenter." - Meister Eckhart

#12 priestess

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 03:52 PM

Palo Mayombe isn't just a path you can enter and go wheeeee! I'm doing my own thing and it actually works! Nah - I mean, the prenda, is a very powerful tool that should not be used foolishly. And using the LBRP is definitely not a Palo thing. People who are learning Palo get confused when these types of posts are made, and the teachers have to set the student of Palo straight. To me, this is not true Palo, maybe it isn't meant to be, but I wouldn't start messing around with Palo traditions like the prenda and using them for your own new "paradigm."

Just my $0.02.

#13 Starbeast

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 05:40 PM

priestess said:

Palo Mayombe isn't just a path you can enter and go wheeeee! I'm doing my own thing and it actually works! Nah - I mean, the prenda, is a very powerful tool that should not be used foolishly. And using the LBRP is definitely not a Palo thing. People who are learning Palo get confused when these types of posts are made, and the teachers have to set the student of Palo straight. To me, this is not true Palo, maybe it isn't meant to be, but I wouldn't start messing around with Palo traditions like the prenda and using them for your own new "paradigm."

Just my $0.02.

Well I would :D Both me and Teo are chaos mages of a sort, and slightly nutty ones at that. I think he's just using the term Palo because it's hardxcore evulness and also he has a prenda. But hey...it's a new tradition, it should be judged on its own terms. Things evolve, even if they mutate into totally new ideas. I think Palo Mexica classifies as a totally new idea - and I also am against the idea of using an LBRP with it, to be honest. I would think a banishing ritual that delineates space without using an LBRP format and terms like "sign of the enterer" - which are highly specialized terms even in CM - would be good. Something with more Aztec symbolism and less Qabalistic flavor.

In short? Develop your own path. The spirit pot in general is a tool - one intrinsic to traditional Solomonic magic, banishing rituals are tools. But you shouldn't be copping everyone else's ideas for how to use the tools. You're a chaos mage by nature - create your own. The roots are here...they could be pretty awesome.

:cool: 37+0=X
AwesomeJon 37 unveiled: 04/06/10...the Conversation continues :) Xeper is no longer a useful concept - but Awesome still is.

Nothing stops me! I've got an awesome 'tude for an awesome dude and I'm actually seriously practicing...the world is within my grasp!

Call me Jon ^^

http://liberverendus.wordpress.com/ The action happens here....in the Book of Awesome! :D

And always remember...keep it heavy! \m/\m/

#14 teopiltzin

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 08:10 AM

I call my practice Palo because of the central role the prenda has in my practice. Mexica, because I venerate and work with the aztec powers. It is by no means a lineage that stems directly from any other Palo. It just seems like a catchy name. What else could I call it besides Palo Mexica. I don't use banishing ritual anymore, I simply unbundle my medicine pouch at have four stones that represent the four Tezcatlipocas that presumably created the universe, the four sons of Ometeotl. I open my caldero when i'm performing any type of magick and close it when the prenda needs rest, purely symbolic though.

I time my prenda rituals through the Cholq'ij calendar and there are certain days that I observe that relate directly to the powers I invoke through my prenda. One thing I recently added was graveyard dirt and am trying to attract ghosts to come to my aid through a pact between us and the caldero. I'm giving certain ghosts partial control over the prenda (a Cihuateteo spirit). Also, another aspect of traditional Palo that I have incorporated into my own practice has been the use of firmas or signatures which are similar in a way to sigils, but are not manufactured the same way.

To my understanding, each palero has his own firma, but can use others that have already been created to attract certain spirits. At this moment, there is a firma in my backyard that a traced with white chalk on concrete that represents the Munanso (House) Nganga (prenda) plus a sigil of my own construction. It ended up being the shape of a missile which I could astrally load and aim into any of the four directions towards a target whether alive or inanimate for different purposes depending on what the goal is.

I also time my shamanic journeys by the Cholq'ij. Tomorrow for example is 5-Kan which is ruled over by Huehuecoyotl. The god of this thirteen day period of week is also Huehuecoyotl, the trickster, back-biter, etc..I'm be traveling to Mictlan the land of the dead to look for Mfumba or dead people to bring to my prenda. I have two prendas now, each dedicated to a different aztec god. It's quite the adventure traveling to different places to find things to put into your vessel(s).

I don't claim to be a palero but a nahualli. Aztec sorcery is a lost art and you could only find a few academic tidbits here and there about what it's all about. That's why it needs to be reconstructed creatively. If it works, it works. The gods don't care as long as you venerate them with ferver and true devotion (not trying to preach, just my take on it).

And regarding the LBRP, I only use it when my mind is really cluttered and I can't work with the correct concentration. Clears my fogginess.

I'm currently working on getting to know firma magick, but it's been quite difficult to do as there are not many good online resources on Palo Mayombe, but I do have a few books on the subject, but they're all in spanish and my spanish is a little rusty. Look up 'palo mayombe firmas' in google images and you'll see what I mean.

There's a lot more I could say about Palo Mexica, but I'll save that for another thread as I am ill at the moment, which is why I couldn't respond earlier. When i'm better, I'll be to constructing my ideas and putting them into concrete practice. I'll share the results.

Yours in the struggle,
--Teopiltzin

#15 Fray

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 10:56 AM

I must say I enjoyed your posts very much..and what you seem to be working with has an interesting flavor to it. I understand that from a traditionalist's perspective e.g. a Palero like Priestess there could be more than a few remarks, but personally I'm big fan of syncreticism and amalgamation. And rare is the Power I've encountered that really minded where you stole a tidbit of inspiration from. In the end it's all about gnosis, an of course power.

I look forward to reading more, I'm off to study the longer posts more so myabe I come up with a question I need answered or a quip of my own :D
“Ordinary morality is only for ordinary people.”

#16 Mugami

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 10:36 PM

Teo... you're interesting. Nice read.

Along The Path of our lives we may believe we have choices. It is only at the end of The Path, looking back, may we then realize, that of our choices, we had none. And know then, that Everything was Fate.


:ninja: :huh: 地火風水死無気道 :squee: :ninja:


#17 Blax_Rose

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Posted 21 October 2010 - 12:02 PM

I also enjoy reading your posts. I've found myself more and more interested in themesoamerican cultures more typicaly the aztecs. I'm looking forward to learning more and reading your posts. :)

#18 teopiltzin

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Posted 20 October 2014 - 08:29 AM

who edited my old posts.

#19 teopiltzin

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Posted 20 October 2014 - 08:46 AM

Pardon the non-linear, blah.

I wrote the first thread, alright. I feel like i'm being BSd did i write the above? seem to have wrote it because it says "Who edited my old posts." But that's not what I ended up writing, Okay. If you feel like you wanna laugh at this, then it must be the real Teopiltzin, right? Why does my writing seem kinda weird and edited. I liked it better with grammar errors anyway.

Doing fine, just need to put in some more effort into my spiritual work, as in gotta start reading and get to it besides normal stuff right?

I'll post again some day maybe right? Perhaps if I need to.

"The only thing we have to fear is fear itself"

Yours in the struggle,
--Teopiltzin

Edited by teopiltzin, 20 October 2014 - 08:52 AM.


#20 Lord of Knowledge

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Posted 02 March 2015 - 06:02 AM

I had a "Book" (or just a Book of Shadows) that one of my Friends wrote for me.
He was a Native Nahuatl Speaking Mexican that still worshiped The Gods of Old.
He lives in Queretaro, Mexico.
I still have the Book, but I just have to find it.

The Moon is My Mother

The Sun is My Father

The Earth is My Home

"An it Harm None, Do what ye will"






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