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Galantamine, Lucid Dreaming, and OBEs


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#1 Curious Cat

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 12:47 AM

I originally wrote this article for the OC newsletter, but I don't think that it is going to happen. If it is, I would be more than happy to contribute another article to substitute this one.


For the past year I have been dabbling with lucid dreaming techniques. For those you that aren't aware, a lucid dream is where you realize that you are dreaming and by becoming awake within the dream you are able to manipulate the dream itself. Some believe that lucid dreaming is actually a gentle method of achieving an out-of-body experience. Many of the techniques I began using can be found in the book Exploring the World of Lucid Dreams by Dr. Stephen Laberge. Laberge actually did his PhD research at Stanford proving the existence of lucid dreams and is considered to be one of the pioneers in the field.

I had decided to attempt to lucid dream in large part so that I might explore my own subconscious mind and also to tap into Jung's idea of the collective unconsciousness. I have had many dreams some of which were precognitive, these types of dreams happen much more often when I meditate regularly, usually twice a day.

Using lucid dreams for spiritual purposes is not original. The Tibetans have been using something they call Tibetan Dream Yoga for at least a thousand years. I will perhaps talk about this at another time.

My most successful experiments of late have been with the aid of over the counter supplements. The main supplements I have been using, particularly galantamine, I first read about in Thomas Yutchak's book, Advanced Lucid Dreaming. Galantamine essentially works by helping to boost the levels of acetylcholine in the brain, which are at their highest point during REM activity at the end of the night when we have our longest, most intense dreams of the night. If you choose to use galantamine it is necessary that you wake up after roughly five or six hours sleep since most of your deep REM periods are towards the end of the night. I will speak more on the brain's neurotransmitters and how they affect sleep later if there is an interest.

The first time I used galantamine I waited an hour for the supplement to kick in and during that time I meditated and focused on having a lucid dream. When I was ready to attempt what is called a Waking Induced Lucid Dream or WILD for short, which means there is no break from waking consciousness directly into the dream. The method I used to enter the dream state the first time was to allow a sort of daydream to appear in my mind and then I focused on it while remaining relaxed. During that time I began to feel as if I was moving very quickly through a tunnel and my whole body started to feel like it was vibrating. All of a sudden I felt the physical sensation of rolling out of my bed and then I noticed I was standing next to my bed. Unfortunately I forgot that I was asleep and I began walking around my house thinking that I was awake.

Since that first time I have had many more experiences using this supplement. I am usually successful 70% of the time, which is much higher than when I make attempts without its use.

If you choose to experiment using galantamine, I would be more than happy to answer questions or to talk about some of my past experiences, some of them were quite profound.

#2 VIRAL

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 05:14 PM

Try quinine.

#3 Curious Cat

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 06:44 PM

VIRAL said:

Try quinine.

I read a bit of info on quinine just now, but I haven't found anything to suggest that it would help with lucid dreaming or possible dosages for that sort of thing.

I noticed that coke and H dealers seem to use it to cut their product with since it has a synergistic effect.

What dosages do you use and what results have you had?

#4 333OnlyHalfEvil

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 05:36 AM

How would Laberge go about proving that lucid dreams are real?

#5 Akiwa

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 08:43 AM

Never heard of Galantamine, but would like to know more about it

#6 Rose

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 02:48 AM

It's a medication for treating Alzheimer's? Aw, reading about Alzheimer's makes me sad. :) Anyway, is by prescription only, yes?

here is a not peer-reviewed paper by aforementioned Thomas Yutchak: Pharmacological Induction of Lucid Dreams

#7 Curious Cat

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Posted 29 August 2013 - 09:41 PM

It is available in supplement form.

#8 jes

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 09:26 PM

Curious Cat, how regularly and how much did you take it before it had an effect on lucid dreaming?
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#9 Curious Cat

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 10:20 PM

If you have practiced meditation for any length of time, you should be able to have one on your very first attempt. Here is a very simple version of a practice that you can try out.

Go to sleep. Wake up after 5-6 hours. Take 8mg and then stay up for 45 minutes. You may wish to eat an apple before you take the pill to avoid stomach upset. You may also wish to journal about what you would like to dream about. Lay back down, but as you fall asleep make sure to repeat a mantra and try not to lose focus. As you fall asleep you may feel like you are going through a tunnel or you body may feel like it is vibrating. This is normal at a certain point you will likely go directly from the waking state to the dreaming state with no break in perception.

You can look up the WILD technique and the Wake and Go Back to Bed method, which is sort of what I described above, but combined and with a couple of variants.

Don't take galantamine more than once a week since you will develop a tolerance. At higher doses there can be side effects, so avoid a dose higher than 8mg.

#10 jes

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 12:42 AM

Thanks for the info :)
It doesn't matter what they say, in the jealous games people play - The Go-Gos

For my will is as strong as yours, and my kingdom is as great.... you have no power over me.

#11 R. Eugene Laughlin

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 05:27 AM

Nicotine is the most effective dream vividness enhancer I know of, but smoking cigarettes won't do because the levels go up and down too quickly to last more than an hour or so into a sleep episode. A time-released nicotine patch placed an hour before bed and left on all night, however, can produce amazing dream states. Lucidity remain a tricky, flighty thing, though with the vividness meter essentially off the charts, dream memory is also hugely enhanced, which in my opinion might be better than in-dream lucidity anyway.

If you can let the mind do as it will and reliably capture a strong memory trace from it, I don't see much advantage to imposing conscious direction. Wouldn't you rather catch your mind in the act while the conscious control mechanisms are offline?

Edited by R. Eugene Laughlin, 26 September 2013 - 05:27 AM.

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#12 Curious Cat

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 08:33 PM

I've used the patch for dream enhancement and while it did make my dreams more vivid, I had much more interesting results using the galantamine.

#13 RoseRed

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Posted 26 September 2013 - 09:08 PM

Quote

Wouldn't you rather catch your mind in the act while the conscious control mechanisms are offline?

That's sort of what I do. I know I'm dreaming, I can act or change things if I want to but I find it so interesting to just sit back and watch things play out.
When my wings get tired I grab my broom.

#14 jes

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 12:22 AM

View PostR. Eugene Laughlin, on 26 September 2013 - 05:27 AM, said:

Nicotine is the most effective dream vividness enhancer I know of,
I've been doing this college thing where I get four hours of sleep, go to class and come back for an hour or so nap. So I've had five spontaneous lucid dreams and one OBE over this semester and last. The past two times, I know I had a lot of coffee during my morning class, so maybe caffeine also has an effect on lucid dreams. A hypothesis! I mention this because I feel like caffeine and nicotine takes me to a similar mental space. Although, the first 3 times I may not have had any coffee at all.
It doesn't matter what they say, in the jealous games people play - The Go-Gos

For my will is as strong as yours, and my kingdom is as great.... you have no power over me.

#15 Curious Cat

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Posted 27 September 2013 - 09:13 PM

View Postjes, on 27 September 2013 - 12:22 AM, said:

The past two times, I know I had a lot of coffee during my morning class, so maybe caffeine also has an effect on lucid dreams. A hypothesis! I mention this because I feel like caffeine and nicotine takes me to a similar mental space. Although, the first 3 times I may not have had any coffee at all.

Anything that boosts acetylcholine in the brain should theoretically make dreams more vivid from what I have read.





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